Adding more information about how to use several persistence volumes for different...
authorchals <chals@altorricon.com>
Tue, 23 Apr 2013 18:34:01 +0000 (20:34 +0200)
committerchals <chals@altorricon.com>
Sun, 28 Apr 2013 09:33:11 +0000 (11:33 +0200)
manual/en/user_customization-runtime.ssi

index 57e89f3..ede470b 100644 (file)
@@ -180,8 +180,14 @@ code{
 
 Then we reboot. During the first boot the contents of #{/home}# and #{/var/cache/apt}# will be copied into the persistence volume, and from then on all changes to these directories will live in the persistence volume. Please note that any paths listed in the #{persistence.conf}# file cannot contain white spaces or the special #{.}# and #{..}# path components. Also, neither #{/lib}#, #{/lib/live}# (or any of their sub-directories) nor #{/}# can be made persistent using custom mounts. As a workaround for this limitation you can add #{/ union}# to your #{persistence.conf}# file to achieve full persistence.
 
+3~ Using more than one persistence store
+
+There are different methods of using multiple persistence store for different use cases. For instance, using several volumes at the same time or selecting only one, among various, for very specific purposes.
+
 Several different custom overlay volumes (with their own #{persistence.conf}# files) can be used at the same time, but if several volumes make the same directory persistent, only one of them will be used. If any two mounts are "nested" (i.e. one is a sub-directory of the other) the parent will be mounted before the child so no mount will be hidden by the other. Nested custom mounts are problematic if they are listed in the same #{persistence.conf}# file. See the persistence.conf(5) man page for how to handle that case if you really need it (hint: you usually don't).
 
-3~ Using more than one persistence store
+One possible use case: If you wish to store the user data i.e #{/home}# and the superuser data i.e #{/root}# in different partitions. Create two partitions with the #{persistence}# label and add a #{persistence.conf}# file in each one like this, #{# echo "/home" > persistence.conf}# for the first partition that will save the user's files and #{# echo "/root" > persistence.conf}# for the second partition which will store the superuser's files. Finally use the #{persistence}# boot parameter.
+
+If a user would need multiple persistence store of the same type for different locations or testing, such as #{private}# and #{work}#, the boot parameter #{persistence-label}# used in conjunction with the boot parameter #{persistence}# will allow for multiple but unique persistence media. An example would be if a user wanted to use a persistence partition labeled #{private}# for personal data like browser bookmarks or other types, they would use the boot parameters: #{persistence}# #{persistence-label=private}#. And to store work related data, like documents, research projects or other types, they would use the boot parameters: #{persistence}# #{persistence-label=work}#.
 
-If a user would need multiple persistence store of the same type for different locations or testing, such as #{persistence-private}# and #{persistence-work}#, the boot parameter #{persistence-label}# used in conjunction with the boot parameter #{persistence}# will allow for multiple but unique persistence media. An example would be if a user wanted to use a persistence partition labeled #{persistence-subText}# they would use the boot parameters of: #{persistence}# #{persistence-label=subText}#.
+It is important to remember that these volumes, #{private}# and #{work}#, also need a #{persistence.conf}# file in its root. The live-boot man page contains more information about how to use these labels with legacy names.